Hey, Jude!

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Screenshot of JudeMaris YouTube Page

Screenshot from JudeMaris’ YouTube Page

Forensic reconstruction has been on my mind lately. Not only is it used to bring faces back to the faceless, but reality to images long idealized. You’ve probably seen them somewhere on social media: age progressions of celebrities and missing children. But how about icons who died before their time? Or those who sacrifice their appearances in battle? Those are the subjects that capture my attention. 

     Ever since graduating (finally!) I’ve taken advantage of my free time to explore my growing interest with facial reconstructions. While it has taken me to some pretty dark places (unidentified murder victims and suspects) it has taken me to more pleasant .

     This guy/gal (?) doesn’t just reconstruct Egyptian mummies, but other members of the expansive club we call history. While most of his/her(?) subjects are Egyptian Fayum portraits (adjusted for accurate eye and skull proportions), the most compelling images in my opinion include a hypothetical age progression of Charles Lindbergh Jr. and the restoration of a civil war soldier facially deformed from battle. If you want to take a peek into alternative history, check out this JudeMaris’  page.

     While you’re at it, here are two more pages with age progressed (and regressed) images of historical figures and recovered missing kids:

http://sketchcop.com/commissioned-historical-age-progression/
https://www.bizarrepedia.com/age-progression-reliability/

Come On To My “House”

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I return from a long hiatus to bring good news. By now most of you already know that my hometown of  Charlotte has been the latest city to see protests erupt in response to a questionable police-related death. Once violence erupted, many businesses within the vicinity of the chaos (mostly hotels) were vandalized on the first night. Since that night, many buildings were flanked by plywood where windows once stood. A lot of reservations were cancelled, losing the hotels a good amount of money. However, one guy had a great idea.

Matt Allen, general manager for the Hyatt House hotel, invited every artist in the Charlotte area to enhance the plywood with their talents. Being an artist as well, yours truly  could not resist the opportunity to be part of wonderful, project. From the locals such as the Charlotte Art League and my fellow SketchCharlotte member Mike Wirth and his art students pitched in with a variety of art mediums.

Naturally, media arrived to follow up on this wonderful movement.  The day I arrived, Fox News, international news agency CCTV, and local affiliates WSOC and WCCB came down to check out our work. Liz Foster of WSOC-tv interviewed me and representatives of the Charlotte Art League. (Link below. May have to sign onto facebook)

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It took 8 hours to complete my work. By the end, my legs hurt from standing all day and I was running low on energy. However, it was an energy well spent. Matt and the staff of the Hyatt House were the most gracious people, helping us out with any supplies we needed. When they let us use their restrooms to clean our brushes, I actually felt hesitant to dirty up the hotel’s gorgeous bathrooms with my messy supplies and make more work for the custodial staff. I offered to use the bar’s back kitchen but everyone said the lobby restrooms were just fine. These people were affected the most by the vandalism. Reduced business always effects those below the corporate level most. I felt compelled to help bring business back to the city, but of course I wasn’t the only one.

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(left) Work in Progress. (right) Design by Mike Wirth

 

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Charlotte: where everybody knows your name….

It was a wonderful experience. I made new friends, ran into old friends who happened to be walking down the street, and if anything else, helped bring Charlotte’s art scene to the mainstream. What am I talking about? When I first moved here back in 2012, I had to go out of my way to find the local art communities. Due to the upscale nature of uptown, a tourist will only have access to more formal institutions like the Bechtler, the Mint or Foundation for the Carolinas. Unless they catch an artPOP billboard or ride a tour bus that will stop in the North Davidson area, visitors will not be exposed much any local art.  By having an exhibit right where visitors can pass by and see what the other side has to offer, they may have just one more reason to come back.

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Queen Corgi says “hi”

 

 

The “Phantom” Predescessor

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You may not have read this comic but if you grew up in the US before 2000, I bet you’ve come across it while looking for Garfield in the newspaper. Lee Falk’s The Phantom predates Superman by 3 years and set the standards for many tropes we associate with the Man of Steel.

I would provide a full retrospect but YouTuber Midnight’s Edge has that covered.

 

Tabling Life: Union County SuperCon

Over the weekend, Union County North Carolina library System held their annual SuperCon. Run by Indian Trail Branch Manager, John Tompkins, the event has been successful with families for a couple years running now.

Tompkins (right) with a Special Guest

Tompkins (right) with a Special Guest

The group SketchCharlotte and I were invited to commission illustrations for the local kids in addition to selling some of our works.

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I met many more artists and young kids who are still figuring out what to do with their ability to draw. As it turns out, this event was the introduction not only for those with no understanding of comics but for the larger HeroesCon remains out of reach. A few children came by our table admitting their bravery to come out to the show as they shared their artwork. The one thing I could tell them was how lucky they were to have a library with such rich access to comics.

Perhaps erroneously, I assumed a small county would shy on the comic collections, similar to the ones from my childhood. However, UCPL (as much as it pains me to say) puts the more urban Mecklenburg County libraries’ collection to shame. Even the main branch downtown.

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Seriously, This is more than the quarter shelf of comics I see.

As a matter of fact, they had so many, they had to sell one or 30. Of course I helped them out.  In the end, I’ve made many more friends, both professional and student. I cant wait to go back.

A swap, a deal and a glimpse of a future career ( Artist: Tyrone Leung)

A swap, a deal and a glimpse of a future career.

While the SuperCon is not well advertised beyond the county, but if you live in the Charlotte/ Kannapolis / Lincolnton area, I say this event is worth the day drive. If interested, check out for updates on UCPL’s website: http://www.union.lib.nc.us/

Credits

The Slackmatic Mini-comic by Ryan Holgerson: https://twitter.com/slackmatic
The Fan Art by Tyrone Leung (instagram: @tyrone_leung)

Buster and Bart: A Century Apart

In 1899, comic artist RF Outcault created The Yellow Kid, a working class ethnic child who pulled cons, for the Hearst papers. Not long after that series ended, Outcault followed up with a similarly ill-behaved rich WASP named Buster Brown.

There was no concrete evidence of Outcault’s intentions with the strip. The fact that he was forced to create the series due to reader backlash to his Yellow Kid series suggests otherwise. I’m certain under the humor directed to an upper class audience, there also lies a hidden mockery of said audiences’ values and behavior.

One strip comes to mind when, as the title says, Buster decides to throw himself a surprise party and Mrs. Brown is greeted at the door by gift-bearing tykes.

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It’s natural to assume Mrs. Brown would just tell the children to go home, right? Wrong. Instead, she invites them in and quietly rushes her servants to order party refreshments as soon as possible without the guests noticing.

Let’s not be mistaken. Buster Brown has pulled some pretty bad pranks for a boy of his era: Cutting a girl’s hair. Tricking a strange man into walking in on his mother in a changing room on the beach. Faking his own death.

 

Yes, you heard the last one right.
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However, the “surprise party” prank pisses his mother off so much that by the second to last panel she threatens to send him to a reform school, her most serious threat in the whole series.

Do you know what they would do to pretty faces like yours?

Now, from the modern perspective, only two trains of thought generate from this story: “Buster’s mother is an idiot” or maybe “priorities of the rich were different back then.” A nearly century old comic strip is bound to create values dissonance for 21st century readers, and does so often. This strip in particular, however, does not seem so foreign in time. Here’s why:

 

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MARGE: “Bart, are ALL these children friends of yours?

BART: “Friends and well-wishers. Yes”

 

It would take the passage of that very century for another similar situation on a 1994 episode of The Simpsons  where the eponymous family gets a pool. Every kid in town gets wind of the news and it’s not long before the Simpson’s house is flooded with swim-suited children. One scene that has always caught my attention (and funny bone) involves Marge questioning Bart about his unusually large circle of friends, including a trio of boys who look too old to be in high school walking by as they address Marge by another name and greeting another kid in the kitchen as Bart.

Back in real life, if your mother was anything like mine, she’d never let any kid I invited over into the house unless she knew that kid’s parents personally. To see Buster’s mother frantically accommodating a spontaneous children’s party may seem silly to our modern eyes, but to be honest not much has changed. The mediums are different, the socioeconomic statuses of the families are different. There’s no argument that Buster Brown’s family would have a much different set of values than the Simpsons (the latter family has a much more equal relationship with the ethnic whites and blacks than the former, after all). It seems however, that the mothers of both mediums remind us that regardless of class and time, there will always be that one dimwitted mother who goes against common sense when it comes to her children’s affairs. Timeless.

“I look like Buster Brown……whomever that is.”

Will The Real Royals Please Stand Up?

Royal portrait artists were the photoshop of their day: erasing any and all flaws of their subject. Take King George IV and Queen Caroline for instance:

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On the other end, cartoonists of the day exaggerated the flaws for comedic or commentary purpose, as seen with our lovely royal couple below.

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If not for these opposing factions, we would never get any accurate representations of people.

Pencils and Pixels

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This week, my comics group, SketchCharlotte, held a gallery opening for comics, comics – related art and all alternative art. If interested, it’s still running now through February 12, 2016 at the Max L. Jackson Gallery, in the Watkins Building at Queens University.  Come see original works by me and many of Charlotte’s great local artists. And bring money, for alot of our stuff is for sale!

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Date and location Information about the Gallery.

For More Information, check out the Facebook page from BigDogStudio:
https://www.facebook.com/events/171807783177261/ik

The Material Is Strong With This One.

THIS POST CONTAINS SPOILERS FOR STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS.

 

A week has passed since I hopped in line to get a fresh seat for Star Wars: The Force Awakens (which was NOT easy, thanks repeat viewers). Although I consider myself a casual fan of the firm series, it was still on my mind after New Year’s Day. Started with a sketch and developed from there.