Hey, Jude!

Screenshot of JudeMaris YouTube Page

Screenshot from JudeMaris’ YouTube Page

Forensic reconstruction has been on my mind lately. Not only is it used to bring faces back to the faceless, but reality to images long idealized. You’ve probably seen them somewhere on social media: age progressions of celebrities and missing children. But how about icons who died before their time? Or those who sacrifice their appearances in battle? Those are the subjects that capture my attention. 

     Ever since graduating (finally!) I’ve taken advantage of my free time to explore my growing interest with facial reconstructions. While it has taken me to some pretty dark places (unidentified murder victims and suspects) it has taken me to more pleasant .

     This guy/gal (?) doesn’t just reconstruct Egyptian mummies, but other members of the expansive club we call history. While most of his/her(?) subjects are Egyptian Fayum portraits (adjusted for accurate eye and skull proportions), the most compelling images in my opinion include a hypothetical age progression of Charles Lindbergh Jr. and the restoration of a civil war soldier facially deformed from battle. If you want to take a peek into alternative history, check out this JudeMaris’  page.

     While you’re at it, here are two more pages with age progressed (and regressed) images of historical figures and recovered missing kids:

http://sketchcop.com/commissioned-historical-age-progression/
https://www.bizarrepedia.com/age-progression-reliability/

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Ode to an Addams

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Top left: Addams ' original family,
Bottom left: The 1960s tv show
Top right: The 1990 film
Bottom right: The 2012 Broadway production.

Whether he knew it during his lifetime, New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams sparked his own cultural revolution when he created a family of creepy and kooky characters.

60 years after their debut in the New Yorker, the Addams family still speaks to the unapologetic outcast that just wants society to leave them be.

Had Mr. Addams not had the courage to embrace his own (very taboo for the 1930s to 1960s) interests, we would not have Hot Topic, Cristina Ricci or Melissa Hunter’s Adult Wednesday Addams. Or fandom for fictional villains. Or goths in general. He made it ok to get in touch with our dark side.